#stay-home

light at the end of the tunnel

 

Five years ago today we visited Antelope Canyon in Arizona.  My paintings and photographs from that never-to-be-forgotten visit have taken on new meaning today, as we continue to grieve for Nova Scotia.

 

 

 

 

Here is the original post from 5 years ago. Enjoy our visit to Owl Canyon

and learn about the feather on my studio wall.

 

Studio 365: Day 110

 

Feather

 

A treasure in Owl Canyon

Who would have thought it could get any better, but today was another magical day with unforgettable visits to Owl, Rattlesnake and Upper Antelope Canyons. Here are a selection of more amazing images to share with you, and many thanks for all your comments and visits.

The feather from a great horned owl from our visit to Owl Canyon will indeed be the treasure of the trip. It will take pride of place in the studio back home and I can’t wait to use it for more pen and ink drawings.  I did ask our Navajo guide Kim, from Adventurous Antelope Canyon Tours, if I could keep the feather and she very graciously gave her permission. Thank you Kim for a day we will never forget.

Feather ii

On to Bryce Canyon tomorrow.

 

Nova Scotia Strong

a sunday offering


 

I wish everyone a peaceful Sunday but if you are working please know you are never out of my thoughts.
 

a bouquet for easter

 
A bouquet for Easter from the studio today painted once again as a way for me to say thank you to all our healthcare workers and volunteers, heroes and heroines all. They are there for us each and every day and we can’t say thank you often enough.

message from an essential worker

 

A little light relief, with a message from one of our newest essential workers. Wishing everyone a peaceful weekend as we thank all those who will be working for us while we stay at home, and thinking about all those whom we have so sadly lost.

back to the beach

Yesterday Kitsilano Beach was deserted as we are all staying home except for short walks. It is such a special place so I thought I would re-post “backdrop to a life” which was in response to a Discover Challenge from the Daily Post in December 2016. It will show you why it is so special. Re-reading the dedication in the last paragraph seems particularly poignant today as you will read, and it is why I would like to dedicate today’s post to the memory of all those who have lost their lives, and continue to lose their lives every day to the corona virus the world over. May they all rest in peace.

Backdrop to a Life,  December 14, 2016

Yesterday was one of those perfect days in Vancouver that needs to be shared.

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The North Shore mountains, the West End skyline and the shadowed sands of Kitsilano Beach.

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Looking out above the logs to English Bay and the snow-covered peaks beyond.

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 A perfect afternoon for bicycling through the park.

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Who wouldn’t want to stroll in the afternoon sunshine on such a day?

No surprise to those of you who follow The Changing Palette that I would choose this special place to write about in response to this week’s Discover Challenge from the Daily Post: Finding Your Place, in which we are asked by Cheri to bring a place alive that means something to us. But more than that, Cheri writes, “the heart of this challenge is to go further and show how or why this place is particularly special”.

I have shared so many photos from Kitsilano Beach and English Bay over my nearly four years of blogging that the “how” is really self evident.

But what about the “why”? Well, here is my answer.

In 1975, on our first wedding anniversary, my wife and I came to Vancouver from England. We moved into a one bedroom apartment in Kitsilano just a few hundred yards from Kitsilano Beach Park. The following March, on one of our regular walks along the path you see in all of the photos, my wife went into labor and a few hours later our beautiful daughter was born.

The beach was the perfect place to walk with the pram or stroller whatever the time of year, and soon a little brother joined our daughter on those same walks. It soon became a place to stomp in puddles, to take training wheels off bicycles, to bury dad in the sand, to laugh on the swings and slides, to walk with my wonderful late parents whenever they visited, to enjoy the four seasons with the changing colours of autumn, the few days of frost and snow in winter to be followed by the warmth of spring and the heat of summer filled with magnificent skies and those unforgettable sunsets creating silhouettes of lovers sitting on logs or people playing beach volley ball in the dying light.

I could go on and on but I’m beginning to sound like Dylan Thomas. I think you can understand why this place is so special, so meaningful to me, as it has been and continues to be, the beautiful backdrop to our lives over these past forty years.

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Yesterday’s walk, as it always does, lifted my spirits at a time when they are being crushed by the daily news and pictures of new atrocities a world away to the people of Aleppo, particularly to the children; and also as we remember the tragedy of the murdered children of Sandy Hook Elementary School four years ago today. I know you feel as I do that these moments must never be forgotten and so it is with a heavy heart that I pause and dedicate today’s post to the memory of all of these precious lost souls.

the tulip army


 
Today I am honouring all our residents, medical students and indeed all of our health care trainees, with my tulip field “army.” As we face each uncertain day it is so reassuring to know that the future could not be in better and caring hands. Thank you from one grateful generation to the next.

for the nurses


 
Today’s bouquet is to thank and celebrate all of our wonderful nurses here in British Columbia and around the world. I was so moved to hear the nurses from Massachusetts General Hospital on this morning’s news speak of being scared.
 

The nurses from Massachusett’s Hospital

Throughout my career my nursing colleagues were always the angels by my side who were always there for me and for our patients, so that together we could make a difference. Even though I am now retired and isolating here at home they are all always in my thoughts as I cheer them on from the sidelines. I am forever grateful to them for their support and friendship over so many years. Heroes and heroines all. Be well and stay safe. ❤️

Pooh works out


 

 

Painting and collage of Olga Korbut from 1997 and posted previously in December 2014

Pooh’s palette


 

 

Painted in 1986 after a visit to New York and inspired by seeing the works of
Willem de Kooning and the Abstract Espressonits Expressionists.