Photo Essay

oh I do like to be beside the seaside


 

 

 

 

A perfect summer’s day on Spanish Banks, Vancouver today. It doesn’t get much better 🙂

beauties and the beach


 
        
 

Nothing better than our early morning weekend walk on Spanish Banks when the tide is out, with distant figures on the sand and the Vancouver skyline silhouetted against a clear blue sky in one direction and Lighthouse Park, West Vancouver and Bowen Island in the other. The beauty of the wild flowers blossoming amongst the logs and the little commemorative garden overlooking Acadia Beach that is aways there and freshly tended with loving care by an unknown hand, all lift the spirits on this perfect summer’s morning. I hope they lift yours too.

magic walls

This week’s Photo Challenge: Delta from Erica asks us to “explore the ways in which a single photograph can express time, while only showing us a small portion of any given moment.”

These photos are from a recent visit to a memorable exhibition at Vancouver’s Museum of Anthropology entitled Traces of Words: Art and Calligraphy from Asia.

Part of the exhibit includes an amazing interactive world from ultra technologists teamLab, founded by Toshiyuki Inoko in 2001, which “seeks to navigate the confluence of art, technology, design and the natural world.” This short edited video I took will explain why the photos seemed to fit this week’s challenge since the magic walls capture only “a small portion of any given moment.”

To learn about the exhibit and to see a stunning video of teamLab’s interactive world I recommend visiting the Museum’s website here.

From Yardwork to Artwork: The Margarita Story Part One

Perfect yard work weather combined with a little art work once again.

“bears is sixpence extra”

Dedicated with thanks to the memory of Michael Bond who died yesterday aged 91 who brought, and continues to bring, so much pleasure to our family and to millions of families around the world with his stories of Paddington Bear whom he introduced to us in 1958 freshly arrived on Paddington Station from “darkest Peru”.

Enjoy the late Sir Michael Horden’s wonderful voice reading the first episode on BBC 1 in 1974

time to say goodbye

Those of you who follow thechangingpalette will remember my year of sundays last Thanksgiving Day and know how beloved our little Sunday was. Sadly, she will no longer be keeping me company in the studio anymore as we said goodbye to her today. We will miss her but are relieved she is suffering no longer. For those of you who didn’t know her visit my Thanksgiving Day post and see how very special she was.

another day like no other

A year ago on June 5th I posted about a day like no other after walking in support of those suffering from Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis. Walking again today in the annual fundraising Gutsy Walk was also a day like no other but for a very different reason and with the disease symbol itself seeming to take on a very different meaning.

As I walked around Trout Lake in the sunshine here in Vancouver this morning with all those suffering from these crippling diseases together with their loved ones and supporters my thoughts were not only with them but also a few thousand miles away in Bermondsey, London where I lived, studied, worked and taught fifty years ago. How many times have I walked across London Bridge and how well I remember its re-opening in March 1973, which I blogged about last year.

And now another night of terror, pain and despair for too many has visited on that same bridge and on those same streets that I knew so well. There are really no more words other than to express my deepest sympathy and heartfelt condolences to families and friends who have lost loved ones, especially the family of Christine Archibald from here in British Columbia, Canada; and to wish all those recovering in those great London hospitals, a full recovery.

Oh how I wish I didn’t have to post this image again so soon after the attack in Manchester.

 

Dedicated to the memory of Jodi.

happy anniversary to an old friend

Homage to Sgt Pepper

When I read that today is Sgt Pepper Day, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the release of one of my favorite records of all time I remembered that the record that I bought fifty years ago lives in a box of vinyls in the basement of our house. Since it has been many years since I last took it out it seemed the perfect time to re-visit an old friend that was once so familiar to me.  Like many of you I suspect, I knew all the words to all of the great songs, but one in particular left a lasting impression.

    

    

Listening to When I’m Sixty Four in 1967 it seemed to be so many years into the future that I couldn’t imagine ever being such an age. Now, fifty years later, I see sixty four in my rear view mirror by a few years.  What happened? Well, I still have my Valentine and even my hair, but best of all beautiful “Grandchildren on my knee,” so “Who could ask for more.”

Enjoy John, Paul, George and Ringo from one of the greatest albums of all time…

…”They’re guaranteed to raise a smile

Weekly Photo Challenge: Heritage

To complement Ben Huberman’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Heritage this week with his photo and description of the moving Reconciliation Pole on the University of British Columbia campus here in Vancouver these photos are also from the UBC Campus and the magnificent Museum of Anthropolgy. I have previously posted about the late great Haida artist Bill Reid’s The Raven and The First Men, which has pride of place in the Museum. Today’s images are a selection from that same visit, which I made on Remembrance Day, 2014.

The following description of the museum is taken from the MOA web site

“The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia is world-renowned for its collections, research, teaching, public programs, and community connections…MOA houses one of the world’s finest collections of Northwest Coast First People’s art in an award-winning building designed by Canadian architect Arthur Erickson. Opened in 1976, the concrete and glass structure is based on the post-and-beam structures of northern Northwest Coast First Nations. MOA’s Great Hall displays huge totem poles, feast dishes, and canoes from the Kwakwaka’wakw, Nisga’a, Gitxsan, Haida, and Coast Salish peoples, while smaller pieces in gold, silver, argillite, wood, and other materials are exhibited elsewhere in the galleries.”

From Yardwork to Artwork: The Photinia Story Part Four or How I Love my Schmutz Haken

It’s that time of year when as you can see yardwork has become a necessity once again with our photinia continuing to shed its leaves on a daily basis. You will recall how in Parts One, Two and Three last May the pruning and sweeping turned into an art project. A year later the story continues in Part Four today with a special shout out to my trusty Schmutz Haken…

…everyone should have one.